Quick Lit: July 2017

I know it hasn’t been long since my last book post, but I’ve read almost 20 books already, so I decided to go ahead and give a quick rundown of those books!

Rating: 4 Stars

I loved this entertaining book, even though it leans towards the didactic side, as most “Christian” novels tend to be. However, I loved the Southern charm, the friendships, and how realistic the story could be. This could easily be anyone’s marriage.

And it got bumped from 3 stars to 4 stars because I actually cried during the story. That means that I was really feeling something for the character. And obviously it was good, because within the last month, I read another novel from the same author!

Rating: 5 Stars

This took me awhile to read because I wanted to savor each poem. While I liked all of them, a few stuck out in particular.

I think that everyone, especially women, can find something to appreciate in DeMulder’s work.

I mean, I don’t think of myself as someone who likes poetry, but if I liked it, then maybe other people who avoided the classes about poetry in college, like me, can like it, too. I would even say that I love it.

Rating: 2 Stars

I read this novel because it was recommended on Modern Mrs. Darcy’s Summer Reading List and I liked another novel that I read by Susan Meissner.

To be honest, this one was weird AF. First, there was the seeing ghosts or whatever the main character saw instead. Then, the main character goes on a quest that is contrary to everything that she’s ever done.

And all of that is on top of some spoilers that I won’t go into.

Finally, the book was meant to teach us all a lesson! Meissner is a great author, but this novel was not great, plus I have no idea how MMD put this on her list.

Rating: 2

I wouldn’t recommend this. The narrator is so self involved that it hurts. And it’s not one of those novels where the author does that on purpose. It’s like, get over yourself and quit thinking about what other people are like when they have sex. Having sex won’t make your life magically better.

Maybe having a real relationship would… but the author misses the point on that one too.

Rating: 5 Stars

I can’t even write a review of this novel. It was too large. It covered so much. I read it as part as Modern Mrs. Darcy’s online book club, so I got to ask a question about one of the characters that I found distracting and the author actually provided an answer! It was cool because I had started a topic on the message board for the book about Friendships just to ask about that character and most people thought what I thought, which was the opposite of what the author intended!

Anyway, the novel touches on racism, being biracial, white privilege, interacting with law enforcement as a person of color, the disparity in medical access, mental illness, access to equal treatment under the law, peer pressure, and a few topics that are very specific to the location to where the novel takes place.

It is amazing how much research went into making this historical fiction novel accurate. The novel goes back and forth between the 1920’s, as the Klan starts to come into Tulsa, and follows the son of a white man and a Native American woman during the summer leading up to race riots that actually happened (and will make your skin crawl), and 2017, where a dead body is found under a very old servants’ home during renovations, in the yard of a teenage girl who is the daughter of prominent white business man and a black woman who is a public defender.

The book is incredibly timely, even though the author took five years to write it. Sadly, even the story of what happened in the 1920’s is timely. I would have read it even without the juxtaposition of the two stories, which eventually dovetail together. Just being educated on the story of Tulsa in the 1920’s was enough. However, the novel was brilliantly written–I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but the ending to the mystery brings up an entirely new topic to discuss!

Do yourself a favor and read this book.

I’m incredibly lazy and prefer audiobooks, but this was only available in hardback and ebook. It was good enough for me to read the real book!

 

Rating: 5

I sure wish that I had read this when it came out 6 years ago! So funny. Mindy Kaling is a total treasure. I am going to read her next novel before the summer is over, for sure!

It was really great to learn that Kaling was on the original writing staff of The Office. Finding out her background as a writer and actress was truly fascinating. I absolutely recommend this to people who love Kaling’s humor, regardless of if they like The Office or not.

And there were a ton of gems, in terms of quotes, too!

Rating: 4 Stars

I am really glad that I finished this book. I wanted to put it down at first, but I like Jenny Colgan, so I decided to keep reading, even though it didn’t grab me immediately.

After a little bit of pushing through, the story was so good that I didn’t want to put it down. I had to know what would happen next! I can’t wait to read the next book in the series. I hope that I will love it immediately, since I already know the characters.

Colgan wrote some amazing characters. I truly loved them and cared about them. They were human. They had faults, but they were likable. The book completely took me to the beach!

Rating: 5 Stars

I love anything with magical realism. I thought that this was a sweet story that was also wonderfully written. The way that stories that didn’t seem to go together came together in the end were amazing and rewarding for me, as a reader.

I know that my review is short for a book with 5 stars, but it’s just really good. Click the link to Goodreads at the bottom for a more complete synopsis.

Rating: 4 Stars

This book is outrageously funny. There are a lot of characters, but it’s worth keeping up with in order to enjoy the book. I highly recommend this novel! Right now, I am reading the second novel, which is also hilarious.

I honestly didn’t think that I didn’t think that I would like this novel or think it was funny.

Rating: 4 Stars

I don’t read a ton of YA novels, but since this was on MMD’s summer reading list, I picked it up.

It was a sweet love story that flips a lot of traditional YA on its head. The woman is strong, thinks outside of the box, and works really hard to be a good computer coder. It was cool to not see her be super needy and think through why she was dating–not just getting a boyfriend because that’s what girls her age did!

Rating: 5 Stars

This was on the longer side, as far as books that I read during the summer, but I read it in two days! I simply couldn’t put it down. The story follows a girl who finds herself pregnant and unmarried following the death of her brother, who returned from WWII with PTSD, but blames herself for his death.

As her mother takes her to Europe for an abortion, since she doesn’t even know who the father is, the main character takes a detour to search for her French cousin, who she had not seen since before WWII. With the help of a drunk woman, who slowly reveals her story, plus her ex convict chauffeur, the three unlikely friends travel across the continent in search of people from the past in order to free themselves from the past.

I loved it. It was absolutely thrilling. It made me incredibly sad. It made me incredibly happy. I recommend this to everyone!

 

Rating: 4 Stars

This story was about love and communication. Like McHale’s other novel, it can be a bit preachy. However, the premise is original and heartwarming.

From the publisher:

Jacey met the man of her dreams a year ago—and hasn’t seen him since. Finally relocating him as the pastor at her best friend’s wedding was the very last thing she expected.

A year ago, Jacey was trapped on a rooftop during a flood with perfect strangers, including a family and a man named Colin. After two days there together, she had no doubt that Colin was the man of her dreams. When they were finally rescued he tucked his phone number into her pocket. But an accident with the rescue boat left her hospitalized with amnesia and PTSD . . . and his number nowhere to be found.

Now, Jacey has still only recovered bits and pieces of her memory from that time. She clearly remembers Colin—but not his last name or any other details that would help her locate him. She’s trying to immerse herself in the joy of her best friend’s wedding . . . when she looks up at the end of the aisle only to discover Colin there in the minister’s role. Shock is an understatement.

The novel bounces back and forth between Jacey’s life and Colin’s life, even when they are not in communication. Jacey’s meddling friend and Colin’s pride keep them apart, but everyone learns a lot for an ending that made me cry. When you learn about what “The Sweet Smell of Magnolias” means, you might tear up, too. Honestly, it was a lovely, heartwarming story of redemption and love. I would recommend this book before reading McHale’s other novel, but I still recommend both.

 

Rating: 4 Stars

I read the first two novels of the series during 2015. I really shouldn’t have put down the series for 2 years because between time and the television, I was really confused. Sidney’s personal life is quite different from the television show, plus I think the year that the story takes place is later in time, but I could be wrong.

However, I enjoyed the mysteries. I didn’t like his wife, though. She is shrill, needy, and demanding. The character almost distracted from the story. I had to keep myself from adding to what was on the page with what I’ve seen in the TV series.

I did keep them apart, the best that I could, and I liked the book for what it was. I intend to read the next novels in the series far more quickly! No more 2 year waits between the books.

Rating: 4

Disclosure: I accidentally picked up the abridged version of this audiobook. It was slightly confusing because I didn’t know that it was abridged and I had seen the movie. I did like it and intend to read it again.

However, Netgalley just asked me to read the prequel to Practical Magic (yay!), so as soon as I read it, I will listen to the unabridged version of Practical Magic and put it all together. So, look forward to my review of The Rules of Magic, which is coming out in October!

Rating: 5 Stars

Wow. I love Elizabeth Strout. Any review that I write will not do it justice.

After picking up I Am Lucy Barton last summer, on a whim, and being blown away, I have been reading her other books. So, I was very eager for her summer release. I was even more excited when I found out that Anything Is Possible is a set of short stories that are related to the character of Lucy Barton. An interesting tidbit that I read is that Strout wrote Anything Is Possible in tandem with I Am Lucy Barton. I wish that I had known that when I was reading the novel. It makes it even more impressive that she could imagine this rich, full world.

I can’t imagine writing a fictional memoir, but Strout did a great job with that. Then, she wove together a set of short stories about the people who would have known Lucy Barton or her family in a beautiful way. The stories were brilliantly connected, beautifully written, and a powerful illustration about the human condition.

Five stars is not a strong enough rating. It’s amazing. It’s not very long. Read it! And if you are interested in finding your favorite new author, read I Am Lucy Barton first, but you don’t have to. However, I wouldn’t read them in reverse order.

 

Rating: 4 Stars

3.5 stars

This was a really cute mystery that I hope is the beginning of a great series. I love prohibition era novels. This one is a rags to riches to rags again story of a woman and her former cook who slip in and out of speakeasies, house parties, and glamorous department stores in New York City as they try to recover a film for a chorus girl, while the body count piles up!

This novel was definitely good enough for me to pick up the second novel in the series and plan on reading it as soon as I finish my pre-planned Summer Reading List!

 

Rating: 4 Stars

Too funny. It was easier to follow this time because I knew the characters a little bit better. I don’t want to talk too much about the plot, since the last book ended on a bit of a sad note, in my opinion.

However, unlike the first novel, which centered around Singapore, this novel was a lot more about Hong Kong. I listened to both the first and second novels. So, it may be that just the first novel’s printed version was the same as this second audiobook, but if not, I did like the change in the second audiobook. The audiobook kept reading footnotes, which were informative and hilarious!

I adore the writer’s style of moving back and forth between people in different people and writing in the first person. Sometimes the changes are abrupt, but it’s like a commercial break that makes me want to keep reading!

Anything Is Possible

The Alice Network

Crazy Rich Asians (Crazy Rich Asians #1)

The Keeper of Lost Things

Dreamland Burning

Today Means Amen

Come Hell or Highball(Discreet Retrieval Agency, #1)

The Sweet Smell of Magnolias and Memories

When Dimple Met Rishi

The Secret to Hummingbird Cake

Losing It

A Bridge Across the Ocean

Don’t forget to check out what I read this past spring and add me as a friend on Goodreads!

Don’t forget to check out some of my other recent book reviews!

The Austen Escape

What I’ve Been Reading: Spring

What I’ve Been Reading: Series Edition

What I Read: January

Leave me a comment with what book I should read in August or a new release that you are excited about! 🙂

 

Categories: What I Read Last Month Tags: , , , , ,
What I’ve Been Reading: Spring Edition (Part II)

Yesterday, I posted about all of the books that I read February-Present that were part of a series or multiple books from the same author.

Today, I am going to review the rest of the books that I that I read. I hope that this organization of reviews is helpful to everyone who is interested in my thoughts on books. Again, don’t forget that you can add me as a friend on Goodreads, so that you can get real-time reviews. I’ve been told that they help people when choosing between which books to read next 🙂

 

A Portrait of Emily Price

Review: 3 Stars

The beginning was super rushed, which made me think that the whole book was going to be bad. Any book where a woman meets a man who is very similar to herself, but “hits it off,” with someone with her absolute opposite makes it seem like things will go awry, but instead the book had a greater moral message. I was glad that I stuck with it, though, because the end came together well.

However, I wouldn’t recommend this to my friends, unless I knew they had a very specific taste in books and a ton of time.

 

Abide with Me

Review: 5 Stars

After I picked up Strout’s My Name is Lucy Barton, I knew that my reading life wouldn’t be the same. Somehow, though, I let her other books fall through the crack until I saw her 2017 publication on the shelves. While I was waiting on Anything is Possible to come in from the library, I decided to pick up with the rest of Strout’s cannon.
Abide with Me was the first novel by Strout, other than My Name is Lucy Barton that I picked up. Her insight into the human character, which she displays masterfully in the short, fictional memoir of Lucy Barton is also evident in Abide with Me. Additionally, the story, which follows the pastor of a small church in New England during the time when people began to turn from the church to psychology, gave the women of the story full, wonderful inner lives full of struggle, individuality, and even sexuality during an era when women were meant to be conform and be chaste.
For such a short novel, Strout uses her characters to touch on the topics of the meaning of life and death, the possibility of an afterlife, class differences, the complexity of marriages and families, and how to love, among so many other strong topics even though the community in which the story takes place is incredibly conservative and restrained.
I simply can’t get over Strout’s masterful, for lack of another better word, ability to bring complex characters to life through their inner lives, rather than dialogue.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Review: 5 Stars

This was a great re-read. I decided to read it again after I read a book about how the movie was made. I read this book again so that I can watch the movie and see the differences, especially since I watched the movie before I read the novella.

Every Secret Thing

Rating: 4 Stars

When Every Secret Thing was originally published, Susanna Kearsley used a pseudonym, Emma Cole. I am guessing it was because the novel is a departure from her usual time travel type novels. Every Secret Thing was even titled Book #1 of a series, but it has been enough years that it is clear that Kearsley isn’t going to follow up.

Honestly, I would have loved it if Kate Murray became the central figure in a series. Most of Kearsley’s other novels are very formulaic (not that it keeps me from reading them), but this mystery series took the journalist on a world-wide search for information to keep herself alive. Also, the body count was kind of high, so it would have made sense to give her more novels where people weren’t dropping like flies.

Anyway, it was really great. I would recommend it, if you like mysteries and WWII.

Every Wild Heart

Rating: 5 Stars

I read this in one day. I wasn’t sure if it was chick lit or a psychological thriller. I loved it, overall, but thought that maybe the author wasn’t sure what genre she was writing.

Another reader compared the mom in this novel to Lorelei Gilmore, which I totally see. The daughter wasn’t exactly a Rory, but there was overlap. There was a total Luke. However, there was an active father, etc.

I was surprised that this was on the Modern Mrs. Darcy Summer Reading Guide when I’ve read other great books that have already been released this summer that were better. I guess it does have mass appeal.

Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.: Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and The Dawn of the Modern Woman

Rating: 4 Stars

I don’t read a lot of non-fiction, but this was a fascinating look at how a highly censored Hollywood took a very racy novella and turned it into an iconic movie with the classy Audrey Hepburn. Because, in all honesty, what Capote wrote has very little to do with what we see on the screen.

Additionally, the novel also talked about how Hollywood whitewashed other books or plays that were made into movies in order to get them around the censors, which was really interesting. There were a lot of censorship rules at the time that I wasn’t aware of! Also, the movie broke a lot of rules/pushed a lot of boundaries, even with things as small as using a little black dress.

The novel was really short, but I learned a lot about Audrey Hepburn, how the movie was made, how movies were made during that time period, and how much power the censors had over what people saw at the theaters!

In Farleigh Field: A Novel of World War II

Rating: 5 Stars

I love Rhys Bowen. Her series are some of my favorite. They are generally very light hearted; however this book felt much more substantial than previous novels.

The novel begins by introducing us to an obvious love triangle. Then, of course, a mystery during the beginning of WWII ensues! I absolutely adored every character. The main character, unlike Bowen’s two most prominent series, has a man for the main character. Her other novels show that women are capable of doing what men do, and there is a young woman in this novel doing that, also, but I liked the switch in perspectives because the main character wasn’t quite the cad that the love interests her main characters usually fall for.

While there is nothing to indicate that this novel was the first in a series, it ended in such a way that there is more than enough material to make it one. And it was so wonderful that in my greed, I hope it becomes one!

Jane Steele

Rating: 2.5 Stars

This one was a bit weird. I really don’t know how to review it.

It’s like Jane Eyre except… no. She’s a murder? Maybe? It’s very morally ambiguous. I don’t recommend it.

However, if you would like something more to go on, here is the synopsis/review that Book Riot Community left on Goodreads:

This Victorian novel follows Jane Steele, an orphan whose life mirrors that of her favorite literary heroine, Jane Eyre. Their paths diverge at this one fine point, however: Jane Steele is a serial killer. She uses her wit, nerves, and slight sociopathy to off abusive men, all the while wondering what would Jane Eyre think? This book scratched all my favorite itches: Victoriana, feminist rage, and excellent, gut-punch sentences. You’ll love this Jane just as much as you love the original.

 

I highly recommend following Book Riot Community on GoodReads. They never leave a number of stars on their reviews, but someone from their team always writes a good synopsis that lets you know if it would be if is a book that you would like. That being said, I liked that synopsis, but the book was weird AF.

The Dry

Rating: 4 Stars

I will begin by saying that I picked this one up because it was part of MMD’s Summer Reading Guide. I am a member of her online book club. I read it in a day, so I could participate in the live chat with the author. So, fun news if you like the book: Reese Witherspoon has purchased the rights to the book!

It is also the first book in a series. If you’ve read this, let me know what you think: would you prefer for the second book to take place in the same small, farming town or would you prefer for it to take place back in the city where Falk is now working? I have a definite opinion. I would love to know what other people think.

If you haven’t read it, you can probably tell that I did like it. It’s a strong 4 stars. I hadn’t read a thriller in a long time until I picked this up. It really pulled me into the story because there are two separate mysteries–one from the present and one from the past. Falk, who is a detective in a big city, returns home for the funeral of a possible current victim. He looks into what has been going on in the town to see if a crime occurred and how they are connected.

It was particularly interesting because it takes place in a rural farming town that is experiencing a drought. In Australia! So, the setting and culture are just different enough from what I’m used to reading to make it fascinating.

The Night the Lights Went Out

Rating: 4 Stars

Wow. Awesome novel. I would recommend this to all of my friends. I really didn’t know anything about it when I started the novel, other than I liked the cover. Yes, I judged the book by the cover.

I also wanted to read a novel by Karen White because she cowrote a novel with two other authors who I enjoy. Fortunately, this was a good place to start. And now, I want to read more of her novels!

One reason this is not 5 stars is because it isn’t really about revealing universal truths about the human character. It doesn’t explore anything thought provoking. It’s just highly entertaining. And some highly entertaining books are 5 star worthy, but this was not one of those.

Also, White tried to pack a lot of different writing techniques and even genres into the novel, which is why it was on the lengthy side. There were blog posts, which gave it the Gossip-Girl-esque feel and flashbacks to the landlord’s childhood and adolescence, which gave a hint of Kate Morton’s influence, since crimes were committed on the land and connected to the present day.

It was definitely a Southern novel because place was important. The land was incredibly important to the novel. It may have even had Southern Gothic elements, specifically in the flashbacks, which took place during the Great Depression and some could argue that the cottage that the main character rented was a character.

There was a romance throughout the novel. And White even threw in a bit of a psychological thriller there at the end (which I would have known about, if I had read what the book was about).

Overall, the characters were endearing. I rooted for them. It was nice to see the layers of the main characters unfold. 

Aside from the novel being a bit of soup made from everything in the fridge, which oddly worked, it was good. I found it a bit slow at the start because the blog posts were confusing, even though I think they were there for comedic effect. Once I committed to it, though, I REALLY couldn’t put it down. I was listening to it in the car, when I woke up early and couldn’t go back to sleep, etc.

The Story of a Brief Marriage

Rating: How do you rate this?

I barely know how to rate this, much less review it. I think that every person who reads this novel will take away something different. At it’s core, it’s about humanity.

The novel isn’t plot driven. It’s more about memories and living in the moment. It’s gut-wrenching when you think about the fact that people are actually living in these conditions. This isn’t a book to read for entertainment. It’s a book to challenge yourself.

I really didn’t know what this book was about when I picked it up. Someone mentioned it on the What Should I Read Next podcast, so I thought it would be a good read. It was. But I don’t feel comfortable assigning value to it. Just read a synopsis:

In the last months of the Sri Lankan Civil War, Dinesh’s world has contracted to an evacuee camp, where he measures his days by shells that fall like clockwork. Alienated from language, home, and family, he is brought back to life by an unexpected proposal from an old man in the camp: that he marry his daughter, Ganga. In the hours they spend together, Dinesh and Ganga attempt to awaken to one another, to reclaim their humanity.

Anuk Arudpragasam’s The Story of a Brief Marriage is a feat of stunning imaginative empathy, a meditation on the bare elements of human existence that give life its pulse and purpose, even in the face of atrocity.

Abide with Me

The Dry

Every Wild Heart

Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.: Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and The Dawn of the Modern Woman

The Night the Lights Went Out

The Story of a Brief Marriage

In Farleigh Field: A Novel of World War II

Jane Steele

A Portrait of Emily Price

Yesterday, I posted reviews of the other books (books in a series) that I read since January. Don’t forget to check those out. You can also read reviews of everything that I read in January here. Then you can get my take on everything that I’ve been reading so far this year. The year is basically half over!

Come back tomorrow for a full review on Katherine Reay’s newest book, The Austen Escape, which I received from NetGalley! You’ll be able to pick it up this fall.

And let me know what you’re planning on reading this summer in the comments because I have a long list that I don’t mind making it longer!

 

Categories: Book Review, What I Read Last Month Tags: , ,
What I Read: January 2017


What I Read- January 2017

 

I didn’t read much in December, so I am combining those two books into this post, since they did not need their own post. Additionally, since I am participating in Erin’s Reading Challenge, I separated the reviews by books for the challenge and how many points they were worth and then books that I read for fun! If you read my post with my predicted reads for the challenge, you’ll see that I read almost entirely different books!

reading challenge

Agatha Raisin and the Walkers of Dembley
(Agatha Raisin #4)

agatha raisin

 

+ 5 points. Freebie book

 

Rating: 4

Review: Great mystery that didn’t differ much from the TV show, but I watched it so long ago that I had forgotten the ending.

Die Laughing (Daisy Dalrymple #12)

die laughing

 

+ 20 points. Homonym book

Rating: 4 stars

Review: Finally, maybe some new characters! I love Daisy’s new friends.

The Bookshop on the Corner

the bookshop on the corner

 

+ 15 points. Mostly green cover book

 

Rating: 4 stars

Review: I can’t figure out where the title came from. However, it was much better than I expected. It’s no great work of art, but the entertainment value was high.

I will add that the author’s forward is worth reading. It’s super cute and will resonate with all book lovers!

The Wrong Side of Goodbye

the wrong side of goodbye

 

+ 20 points. Favorite author book

 

Rating: 5 stars

Review: One of my favorite Harry Bosch novels!

What She Knew

what she knew

 

  • 10 points. Starts with a “W” book

Rating: 3.5 stars

Review: 3.5 at best. It’s not one of the better psychological thrillers that I’ve read. I chose to read this because I haven’t read a thriller in awhile. Unfortunately, it was a huge disappointment. While the ending was a surprise, I just didn’t care.

The author didn’t make me care about the mother or the detective. By including two narrators and barely flushing out the detective, I hated the police force.

I only finished it because I needed it for a reading challenge.

The Things We Wish Were True

The Things We Wish Were True

+10 points. Six word title book

 

Rating: 3.5 stars

Review: Strong 3.5. I didn’t rate it a 4 because that’s for a book that I would think about a lot. This was above average, though. I loved the way the author connected everyone in the neighborhood–even through hardships. Maybe redefining family.

other novels

The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper

The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper

 

Rating: 4 stars

Review: Wow. What an amazing story. I thought it was a bit slow going at first. I didn’t love parts of it, but I was probably identifying with Arthur, who wasn’t loving parts of it either! In the end, it’s a story of enduring love and his journey to realize that. And although he may have lost someone, he gains many more people in the end. That’s not a spoiler. And it was inspiring.

Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own

spinster

 

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: While I don’t share the same worldview as the author, it was interesting to a) learn a lot about famous women of the past and b) how they shaped her worldview. In fact, I couldn’t be much more different from the author, other than my love of reading and writing. The author is a proud Yankee who has had several serious relationships in her life, but now that she is in her 40’s, she is unmarried. I am a month shy of 29, dated a bunch of guys not seriously and married my first real boyfriend when I was 25.

I didn’t take away a lot of facts and dates about the authors she researched. Instead, I took away an overall impression that a woman can be herself, artisticly or otherwise, with or without a relationship–despite what the author might have been trying to communicate.

Modern Lovers

modern lovers

 

Rating: 3 stars

Review: I wanted to love this novel, but I cringed a lot. It was like… get it together people! Why are you all so spoiled and self indulgent?

Along the Infinite Sea (Schuyler Sisters #3)along the infinte sea

 

Rating: 4.5

Review: I couldn’t put this novel down! While it was supposed to be about Pepper, it is mostly about an American who grows up in France and then marries a Nazi. I like that all three Schuyler Sister novels have different formats. Book one vacillates between the past and present, and this third book picks up where Pepper left off in Tiny’s story of book one; book two is a straight forward narrative; book three is finally the furthest in time, around 1966, but is mostly filled with the memories of a woman that Pepper meets.

The tangential connection between the Nazis, Germany, and France is that the woman that Pepper meets has American cousins, who are the very political family that Tiny married into. I loved the story, but I would have loved a novel that centered more on Pepper, since I love reading about the Schuyler sisters!

I’ve never really explained my thought process behind the criteria below, so here it is.

Read These: These are books that I would recommend to almost any friend or person without knowing much about their reading habits.

If You Have Time: These are books that I would recommend to someone, if I knew about what he or she liked to read. These books are more genre specific or niche books. Or, they are books that I would not tell people not to stay away from, but they aren’t high on my recommendation list.

Don’t Bother: These are books that I would never recommend to a friend. They are usually books that I wish that I hadn’t finished reading!

read these

The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper

Along the Infinite Sea (And the entire Schuyler Sisters series)

if you have time

Daisy Dalrymple Series

Agatha Raisin Series

The Bookshop on the Corner

don't bother smaller

What She Knew

Spinster: Making a Life of One’s Own

Modern Lovers

 

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Categories: What I Read Last Month Tags: , , ,
What I Read: September and October 2016

It’s been a long time since I’ve done any book reviews. I thought that I would talk about the books that I read in the last two months! Then, I have a few more ideas for book posts on my favorite summer reads, series that I’ve been reading, etc. I won’t try to review everything that I read this year.

what-i-read-september-october-2016-resized

As usual, I am breaking up the novels between Contemporary and Classics for the Classic Book Reading Challenge!

Contemporary

The Storied Life of AJ Fikry

the-storied-life-of-aj-fikry

Rating: 5 Stars

Wow! I don’t know how I left this sitting in my audible queue for so long! What a touching story about books. If you don’t mind a happy cry, a sad cry, and all the emotions in between, and are a true believer in the power of books, you have to read this. Pick this up ASAP–if you are on the late train like me!

Be Frank With Me

be-frank-with-me

Rating: 5 Stars

Review: One of my favorite books this year! Touching, funny, and a bit eccentric. I HIGHLY recommend this novel.

The Idea of Love

the-idea-of-love

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: I thoroughly enjoyed this novel! It was a light, but more complex than I thought it would be. In fact, when I thought it would be over, it got even more complex! Again, this one has been on my Kindle for almost a year, and I can’t believe that I waited so long to pick it up!

The Trespasser (Dublin Murder Squad #6)

the-trespasser

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: I picked this up the day it came out. While it wasn’t my favorite in the series, I am still glad that I read it. The twist in the plot was VERY unexpected!

The Sugar Queen

the-sugar-queen

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: I love Sarah Addison Allen! Her books are like magic. They are magic. This novel is about Josey, who is a Southern Belle, who hasn’t moved out of her mother’s house, so she is there to take care of her all of the time. Josey, who has never had a close friend before, bonds with a new friend, and struggles with romance along the way.

Like all of Allen’s novels that I’ve read so far, I recommend this one completely!

Commonwealth

commonwealth

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: I love Ann Patchett. While this was no Bel Canto, it was a great novel. There were so many characters that I had a hard time tracking the story at first, since I listened to the audiobook. However, I did like story and how it came together as a whole.

The Secret History of the Pink Carnation

the-secret-history-of-the-pink-carnation

Rating: 3 Stars

Review: I picked this novel up because I read all of Lauren Willig’s novels and I loved them. Once I ran out of her stand alone novels, I started in on this series.

I loved this novel–I read it in two days. I will read the next one in the series. I deducted a whole star for gratuitous sex scenes. Historical novels with gratuitous sex is so cliche. I want the history and mystery, just like this novel. I even love the romance. Just stop the awkward sex.

With that being said, I am going to read the second novel in the series and give it another chance.

The Lola Quartetthe-lola-quartet

Rating: 3 Stars

Review: Not my favorite novel. I really loved Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven so much that I picked up another novel that she wrote. To be honest, I wasn’t impressed. I really loved the dystopian feel of Station Eleven. However, I do want to read the rest of the novels.

While this wasn’t my favorite, you might like it. So, read the synopsis on Goodreads and figure out if you might like it!

Agatha Raisin and the Quiche of Death (Agatha Raisin #1)

agatha-raisin-and-the-quiche-of-death

Rating: 3 Stars

Review: I loved this novel. It’s not bad, but it’s not fantastic–I would recommend this series to anyone who loves cozy mysteries. I was a huge fan of the TV series and this was different and good.

My Name is Lucy Barton

my-name-is-lucy-barton

Rating:5 Stars

Review: Do. Not. Read. This. When. You. Are. Already. Sad. Or tired. This is so beautiful and haunting.
Like a short version of The Gilead. It’s interesting to have someone write a “biography” for a fictional character.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

the-curious-incident-of-the-dog-in-the-night-time

Rating: 5 Stars

Review: Why did I wait so long to read this?! This novel is amazing. Aside from laughing so hard that the chapters were all numbered in prime numbers, the entire story was terrific! The story was entertaining, plus the underlying message was so touching. To read about a young man who struggled to connect with his divorced parents, plus deal with Asperger’s, left a tear or two in my eyes while I also laughed a lot.

Heartburn

heartburn

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: This was the first novel by Nora Ephron that I had read. It wasn’t very long, but it was very full of emotion! I totally recommend this!

When to Rob a Bank

when-to-rob-a-bank

Rating: 3 Stars

Review: Since I don’t read the Freakonomic’s blog and I only just started listening to the podcast, this was a great way to catch up on what the authors have been thinking about since the first book came out. It’s not a work of genius, but it poses some great questions. I particularly liked the guest post about what real former gang members thought about The Wire. I loved the first season, but never finished it!

Mistletoe and Murder (Daisy Dalrymple #11)

mistletoe-and-murder-daisy-dalrymple-11

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: I love this series! I won’t give any of the plot away, but like usual, Daisy helps her husband Alec, solve a murder! Who is glad that Daisy and Alec are finally married?! Me!

That Summer

that-summer

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: More of a 4.5! It wasn’t a great work of art, but I really loved the story. It also didn’t have the “everything works out for everyone” quality that a lot of the popular non-linear novels have. The people where more flawed and love was bittersweet. But I really couldn’t put it down!

The Life We Bury

the-life-we-bury

Rating: 5 Stars

Review: A college student who doesn’t have many relatives, shows up at a nursing home hoping to write a biography for a class assignment. However, most of the residents are senile. There is one resident, though, who isn’t. The college student, Joe, meets Carl Iverson.

Carl is a dying Vietnam veteran–and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home, after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder.

Joe’s life is never the same after writing the story of Carl’s life. And The Life We Bury challenges us to look at life differently, too.

Pick. This. Up.

The Peach Keeper

the-peach-keeper

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: I love the magical quality of all of Allen’s novels, but this one, which touched on the relationship between grandmothers and granddaughters was quite special.

classics

Lady of Quality

lady-of-quality

Rating: 4 Stars

Review: I love Georgette Heyer novels. Like all of romance novels set in the Regency period, this one was wonderful. If you like her novels, read this. It wasn’t my favorite, but it’s good.

Little Women

little-women

Rating: 5 Stars

Review: This classic novel is always a great read. I reread it for book club.

read these

The Life We Bury

The Storied Life of AJ Fikry

Be Frank With Me

My Name is Lucy Barton

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Heartburn

if you have time

That Summer

The Idea of Love

The Trespasser (Dublin Murder Squad #6)

The Sugar Queen

Commonwealth

Agatha Raisin and the Quiche of Death (Agatha Raisin #1)

don't bother smaller

The Secret History of the Pink Carnation

The Lola Quartet

When to Rob a Bank

Please note that comments with links that are not relevant to the discussion will not be approved. Personal signatures with blog URLs will be deleted. Please use the Disqus profile to add your blog’s URL, so that I can find you.

Categories: What I Read Last Month Tags: , ,
What I Read: January 2016

Well, I read a lot of Phyrne Fisher novels, since I want to catch up with the TV show. I tried out a new series. And I picked up a few new authors, too!

what i read january

 

Contemporary

Some Luck

some luck

Verdict: A great look into the 1920’s to 1950’s. Must read for saga-lovers.

I loved this novel. I can see why it Jane Smiley is a Pulitzer Prize winner. Not only was the story highly entertaining, but the prose was beautiful. The story was amazing! It followed so many people, who went through so many changes. During the time of the novel, America went through a ton of changes. Since the family started on a farm, but slowly integrated technology.

The Book of Speculation

the book of speculation

Verdict: Not what I expected. Great for learning about circuses.

I thought that this novel would be more about books. It was about a librarian, but a former librarian. The novel is really more about how an old novel intertwines with a family of circus performers. While I liked how the novel was written, it wasn’t what I was expected. I was thinking something more along the lines of Charlie Lovett’s novels.

The Green Mill Murder (Phryne Fisher #5)

the green mill murder

Verdict: Another fun, quick, mystery.

The Green Mill Murder was interesting because it was based on Phryne’s attendance at a dance-a-ton. It reminded it me a little of that Gilmore Girl’s episode where Rory dances with her mom and that thing happens with Dean… but at least there wasn’t murder there!

Blood and Circuses (Phryne Fisher #6)

blood and circuses

Verdict: A fun Phryne Fisher novel where she leaves the life of luxury.

Phyrne leaves the life of luxury to help her friends in the circus to find out what keeps hurting the circus. Along the way, Phryne has to pick up a new name, learn a new trade, exchange her clothes for used and mended ones. It was nice to see how she acted with a different place, with a different personality, and not in a position of authority.

The Longest Night

the longest night

Verdict: Williams made a statement, but it lacked entertainment value.

I couldn’t fault the great statement that Williams made about morality standards imposed by society, but it lacked entertainment value. It was dry, boring, and I couldn’t quit cringing. The novel skipped around among narrators as it followed Nat, an Army wife, her husband, Paul, a young Army Specialist, and his boss and his boss’s wife. The most cringe-worthy moments were in the young husband’s mind. I am hope it was meant to be slightly cringe-inducing when he describes meeting his wife and thinks of her as loose, but then over the course of their marriage, never gets a chance to know the real her and why she acts the way he does. His temper flares whenever Nat does anything that embarrasses him, even having fun in front of strangers. The shame follows her wherever she goes, even when he is gone.

Overall, the setting, which is in the middle of nowhere, and involves nuclear energy, radiation, cover ups, affairs, Indian reservations, and apparently a lot of Mormons, who are all new and confusing to the Army people, was also bizarre and slightly off putting from a reader’s perspective. I ended up getting the audio-book from the library, so I heard a different voice for every narrator, so that could have influenced my perception.

Thanks to Netgalley for providing an ebook copy to review.

American Housewife

American Houswife

Verdict: Smart, biting, and funny. Must read for women with a sense of humor.

I couldn’t put this down! I thought that it was quick, funny, and insightful. My favorite story was about the reality show. The final story almost felt like a horror story. I had the audio version of this novel from my library, which was fantastic. There were several narrators who were familiar because they read books that I listen to a lot.

I let my husband listen to a few of the stories, which he loved, too.

Thanks to Netgalley for providing an ebook copy to review.

The Crossing

the crossing

Verdict: A must read for Harry Bosch or Lincoln Lawyer fans.

I look forward to Michael Connelly’s fall release every year. This year didn’t disappoint. Harry Bosh worked as an investigator for his brother, defense lawyer Mickey Haller. Bosh was torn about working for the defense, but like any good homicide detective, he didn’t want to just prove that the defendant was innocent, he wanted to find the guilty. It was made more interesting because the guilty party was very dangerous.

Since Bosch is now retired and Connelly combined Bosch and Haller in a single novel, I have to wonder if Connelly will move to just write about The Lincoln Lawyer.

Austenland

austenland

Verdict: Great entertainment for Austen fans who are looking for light fun and romance.

It’s not a genius piece of writing, but it’s incredibly entertaining. If you like Jane Austen (like you can recall the plots to all of her novels), plus quirky main characters and romances, this is for you. You can easily read it in a day or two. I had a lot of fun finding the parallels, which were sometimes laid out by the author for less well-versed readers, but the entertainment value is certainly high. I think I need to read the sequel!

Murphy’s Law

Murphy's Law

Verdict: Great for people who like mysteries who keep you on edge!

I fell in love with Rhys Bowen’s mysteries when I read the Her Royal Spyness series. So, I picked up this series about Molly Murphy, who is on the run from Irish authorities and found a way to America. Unfortunately, there was a murder that complicated her entry, but it introduced her to a handsome detective. I loved Molly’s determination to find the actual person who committed the murder and make her way in New York City.

Death of Riley

death of riley

Verdict: Great follow up!

If you like Murphy’s Law, Death of Riley is a great follow up! Molly finds herself learning from a real private investigator and living with the artsy crowd. I loved it! I can’t wait to keep reading the series. I had to make myself read other novels, or I would have finished the entire series within a week or so!

Eight Hundred Grapes

eight hundred grapes

Verdict: A great light read!

I read a lot of reviews that were 50/50 on this. Some people hated it, but others loved it. I liked it. I thought it was a touching story about family, figuring out what matters, and making the life you want.

Ruddy Gore (Phryne Fisher #7)

Ruddy Gore

Verdict: A big change for Phryne

I have been reading as many Phryne Fisher novels as possible, so I can watch the television show, since the shows are not in the same order of the books. I can’t wait to finish watching the show, since it is so well done.

This novel was a big change because Phryne actually finds a man that she seems like she wants to keep!

The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York

The Poisoner's Handbook

Verdict: A must read!

I have wanted to read this novel for a long time. I love the Jazz Age, but this novel gives an amazing look at the underbelly of society. It also talks more about how life really was for most people, not just the glamorous people, of the Jazz Age.

On Netflix, I watched a documentary based on the novel. The documentary puts pictures and videos to a lot of what went on in the novel, However, the novel was redundant, since the documentary focused more of a few of the cases touched on in the novel, while the novel expanded greatly on the fight against prohibition, since the bootleg liquor was killing so many people, as well as gave insight into other parts of how hard Dr. Norris and others fought to legitimize forensic sciences.

Thornwood House

Thornwood House

Verdict: An haunting search into the past

I couldn’t put this novel down. I would dare to put this novel into the Gothic category. Since it was Australian, I thought that made it more interesting. The main character, Audrey, inherits an old house on an enormous amount of land in a small, quiet city from the father of her child and the only man she ever loved, after he commits suicide. However, she didn’t even know that he had the property or any living family. She moves there with her 11 year old daughter. There, Audrey becomes obsessed with the house and the surrounding property. She becomes enthralled with the home’s former resident, who appears to her in dreams, as she tries to find out if he really killed his wife.

Normally, I wouldn’t have touched a book like this. And as I read this novel, I kept asking myself why I was so enchanted with it. Finally, I realized it was Gothic and Southern Gothic literature is my favorite. If I could have my dream job, it would be as an English professor, specializing in that. So, that’s why I think I found Thornwood House so enthralling.

classics

The Warden (Chronicles of Barsetshire #1)

The Warden Anthony Trollope

Verdict: The shortest Trollope novel that I’ve ever read!

This isn’t my favorite Trollope novel, I am looking forward to reading the rest of the series.

 

read these

American Housewife

Austenland

Eight Hundred Grapes

Some Luck

if you have time

The Poisoner’s Handbook

Murphy’s Law (Or the entire series!)

don't bother smaller

The Longest Night

The Book of Speculation

What I Read: Round Up of Monthly Reads

You can read my past monthly round ups:

December 2015

October 2015

September 2015

August 2015

July 2015

June 2015

Also, you can find other individual book reviews, tips on saving money on Audible books, book recommendations based on genres and all things related to literature here!

Don’t forget that you can add me as a friend on Goodreads so I can steal ideas on what to read next–or see your ratings, so I know what to stay away from!

 

Did you read anything good last month? Are you participating in any challenges? What should I be reading?

 

Will be linking up with The Modern Mrs. Darcy for Quick-Lit!

Please note that comments with links that are not relevant to the discussion will not be approved. Personal signatures with blog URLs will be deleted. Please use the Disqus profile to add your blog’s URL, so that I can find you.

Categories: Book Review, What I Read Last Month Tags: ,
What I Read Last Month: October 2015

What I Read October 2015

So, I kicked last month off with the last published novel in my favorite series, (it took me 10 days to start reading, though). After that, though, I kicked off a huge spree on another series, so bear with me! Then I didn’t read very much because I totally dragged my feet on a final book.

Contemporary

A Dangerous Place

a dangerous place

Verdict: Maisie has a lot going on in her life.

A lot happened between the book before A Dangerous Place and A Dangerous Place. Her life was completely altered, so she was getting it back together. It was interesting and full of new characters, so it wasn’t the same old, same old. But, part of me longed for a book about what happened in between or the same old, same old that I get whenever I pick up a Dobbs novel.

Royal Spyness Mysteries 3-9
royal spyness 1

 

Royal Flush (Her Royal Spyness Mysteries, #3) 

Royal Blood (Her Royal Spyness Mysteries, #4)

royal spyness 2

Naughty in Nice (Her Royal Spyness Mysteries, #5) 

The Twelve Clues of Christmas (Her Royal Spyness Mysteries, #6)

 

royal spyness 3
Heirs and Graces (Her Royal Spyness Mysteries, #7) 

Queen of Hearts (Her Royal Spyness Mysteries, #8)

malice in the palace
Malice at the Palace (Royal Spyness #9) 

So, I sure read a ton of these novels last month! Really, a lot of them. I liked the first two that I read, but I was really caught up in the Maisie Dobbs series. Once I finished those, I had to pick up Her Royal Spyness again. The romance in them kept me reading and reading. I can’t wait for the next release!

Summer Secrets

summer secrets

Verdict: Average summer novel

Not much to say other than I learned a little bit about alcoholism and addiction. I listened to the novel read by the author. I wouldn’t recommend that you rush and put this at the top of your TBR list.

Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike #3)

career of evil

Verdict: A great 3rd novel in the series!

I enjoyed this novel a lot more than the second novel in the series. I loved the first one, but the second one bothered me. It was all sorts of weird. It takes a lot to weird me out. This one was released at a great time, right before Halloween!

So, I spent many, many weeks reading another novel, so I never got to more novels. Plus, pain had me watching more TV than normal. I meant to read some classics… oops!

read these

The Royal Spyness Series

if you have time

Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike #3)

don't bother smaller

Summer Secrets

What I Read: Round Up of Monthly Reads

You can read my past monthly round ups:

September 2015 


August 2015
 


July 2015
 


June 2015
 


May 2015
 

Also, you can find other individual book reviews, tips on saving money on Audible books, book recommendations  based on genres and all things related to literature here!

Don’t forget that you can add me as a friend on Goodreads so I can steal ideas on what to read next–or see your ratings, so I know what to stay away from!

Did you read anything good last month? Are you participating in any challenges? What should I be reading? 

Will be linking up with The Modern Mrs. Darcy for Quick-Lit!

Please note that comments with links that are not relevant to the discussion will not be approved. Personal signatures with blog URLs will be deleted. Please use the Disqus profile to add your blog’s URL, so that I can find you.

Categories: What I Read Last Month Tags: , ,
What I Read Last Month: September 2015

What I Read September 2015

Well, I really didn’t read as much as I wanted to last month, plus this post is much later than I expected it to be! I only read a few, and by read, I mean listened to books! My symptoms are getting really bad, so I’m burning though TV shows and movies like crazy. If you’ve been following me on Instagram, you’ve seen that I went to a cervical dystonia conference at the beginning of October, so, the end of September was spent slowly packing and then watching more TV.

So, as my health deteriorates, I watch more TV and read less. I hope that October’s report will have a few more books. I am hoping to get better treatment soon.

Contemporary

The Sisters of Versailles

The Sisters of Versailles

Verdict: I was glad to read something other than British historical fiction…

I wrote an entire post, which you can read here!

Leaving Everything Most Loved

leaving everything

Verdict: Another great addition to this series

This novel won’t stand alone, but if you are a fan of this series, then I would recommend it!

The Rose Garden

the rose garden

Verdict: A different kind of time travel.

This novel was another Kearsley novel centered around the Jacobites (so far, both novels that I’ve read by her were written about that time period), but her twist on time travel made the romance novel suspenseful and fun.

We Never Asked for Wings

we never asked for wings

Verdict: For people who like good books.

I don’t write that verdict lightly. You can read my full review here!

Everybody Rise

everybody wise

Verdict: I cringed a lot.

I don’t know if the cringing was because the writing was really good, so I could feel the embarrassment for the character, or if the scenarios were like an I Love Lucy episode, minus the punch line. There was nothing funny about this book, but I did like the ending. A+ on the ending.

The Royal We

the royal we

Verdict: A lot more involved and complex than I thought it would be!

I really liked this novel, honestly. I thought it would be light-hearted and fun, but it was more complex and long. The novel was a coming of age story that dealt with things like class, money, and trust in relationships. It was really more of a relationship complicated by royalty than a fairy tale, which I liked. I wasn’t a huge fan of the ending, but it was still good, and I would still recommend it.

The Wife, the Maid, and the Mistress

The Wife, the Maid, and the Mistress

Verdict: An interesting narrative non-fiction piece!

I love narrative non-fiction novels. I don’t want to give anything away, but I loved the way that everything came together in the end. The story was so intriguing, and the fact that it is based on real life, since it seems so fictional, makes it even more sensational!

An Impartial Witness (Bess Crawford #2)

an impartial witness

Verdict: An average second installment of another World War mystery series.

I don’t love and I don’t hate Bess Crawford mysteries. They are pretty vanilla with tons of loop holes. Like, how does this lay person, just a nurse, happen to stumble across so many mysteries and solve them? If I worked for the police, she’d be my suspect!

The Ashford Affair

The Ashford Affair

Verdict: For fans of Kate Morton

I haven’t read a ton of Lauren Willig’s novels, but this particular one should be a hit with Kate Morton fans! I enjoyed it.

classics

Why Shoot the Butler?

why shoot the butler

Verdict: Mystery + Love Story?

I won’t lie, I had higher hopes for this one. As a huge Heyer fan and a huge mystery fan, I thought this would be perfect. However, unlike her Regency novels, which can be downright hysterical, this one was cold and a bit scary. I have another mystery novel that she wrote that is part of a different series (with a different investigator) that I will try out, before I write her mystery novels off all together.

read these

We Never Asked for Wings

if you have time

The Ashford Affair

The Royal We

The Wife, the Maid, and the Mistress

don't bother smaller

The Sisters of Versailles

Everybody Rise

What I Read: Round Up of Monthly Reads

You can read my past monthly round ups:

August 2015
July 2015

June 2015

May 2015

April 2015

Also, you can find other individual book reviews, tips on saving money on Audible books, book recommendations  based on genres and all things related to literature here!

Don’t forget that you can add me as a friend on Goodreads so I can steal ideas on what to read next–or see your ratings, so I know what to stay away from!

Did you read anything good last month? Are you participating in any challenges? What should I be reading? 

Will be linking up with The Modern Mrs. Darcy for Quick-Lit!

 

 

Please note that comments with links that are not relevant to the discussion will not be approved. Personal signatures with blog URLs will be deleted. Please use the Disqus profile to add your blog’s URL, so that I can find you.

Categories: Reading, Uncategorized, What I Read Last Month Tags: , ,
What I Read Last Month: July


What I Read: July 2015 >>> Seriously, Sarah?
I over-requested from NetGalley, so I spent most of July reading those novels, not that I’m complaining. I was able to read some new novels from authors I already liked, plus find some new books!

Most of these were audiobooks, which helped me read more novels. I’ve been extremely sick, so I’ve had a lot of time to listen!
Contemporary

Somebody I Used to Know

Somebody I Used to Know

You can read my full review here. The short synopsis is that I was very surprised to find that this was not a novel of a new writer once I finished the book. I liked it, but I would have expected a tighter plot from someone who has published many more novels.

Birds of a Feather

birds of a feather

I read a paperback copy of the first novel in this series as part of a summer reading challenge. Through my library, I was able to listen to this through Overdrive. I liked the first novel because it gave a ton of necessary background on Maisie Dobbs, but the “mystery,” in the novel wasn’t very great. This mystery was much more intricate, since space wasn’t taken up with background, of course.

I can’t wait to read more of this series!

Love May Fail

love may fail

Silver Linings Playbook is one of my favorite books ever. I’ve thought about reading some of his other novels, so when the Goodreads’ newsletter notified me that Quick had a new book coming out, I knew that I had to read it. I quickly put it on hold at the library and listened ASAP!

I read the book in two days. I absolutely could not put it down! I recommend it (AND Silver Linings Playbook, if you haven’t read it).

Pretty Baby

9780778316558_RHC_SMP.indd

This was an interesting follow up to Kubica’s first novel, The Good Girl, which I thoroughly enjoyed. You can read my full review of Pretty Baby here.

Among the Ten Thousand Things

Among Ten Thousand Things

This is a beautiful novel about love, life that ruins love, family, and what’s leftover when life is done. You can read my FULL review here! This new release is definitely worth your time, even though there aren’t a whole lot of reviews on it yet. I got an early copy from NetGalley – but early by about two days. So, in my typical fashion, I used my accumulating Audible credits to pick it up because I was loving it, but my new medications have my sleep messed up.

I have a short window during the day that I can read physical books/ebooks before I start to lose the ability to follow along and need to lay down and at least shut my eyes. I don’t sleep at night, but I lay there for 8 or so hours before I finally get what I loosely term “sleep.” Therefore, having audiobooks to listen to while I close my eyes are the BEST. I don’t have bluelight messing up my sleep, not that I have the energy to navigate a computer, plus there isn’t much on TV/Netflix that I want to watch, especially in the middle of the night. Oddly enough, books make me feel less alone and sad.

So, since I had to put down the ebook one night, I got the newly released audible and thoroughly enjoyed every second of the book – even when I shed a tear or two.

I don’t know if other readers will appreciate this part like I did, but Simon, the 15 year old son, is a wonderful representation of a teenage boy. He reminded me so much of my moody, angry, teenage brother with a bad attitude! It made me laugh a lot.

The novel reminded me of the humanity in all of us. Parents are people. Kids see more than we know. And kids turn into adults who will perpetuate the cycle.

The Litigators

The Litigators

Average, average, average.

If you haven’t read BJ Novak’s short story about John Grisham, you need to. If you can listen the audio version where Novak reads it, even better. The Litigators embodies everything in Novak’s witty story.

Case Histories (Jackson Brodie #1)

Case Histories

I enjoyed this more than the regular police procedural mystery because it wasn’t neat and tidy. Not only was it a hell of a lot more complicated, there wasn’t a cliff hanger or an ending packaged with a bow.

I want to read more of the series to see how Jackson Brodie progresses, since I felt like some of his clients had such strong personalities/characters that they impeded my “getting to know” the main character. However, they were funny. If I read the novel correctly, and wasn’t just confused, Atkinson played with time, like she did in the only other novel that I’ve read by her, Life After Life. There were scenes that were written where I was like “ah! This scene is the scene that happened a few chapters ago…! And the characters overlapped.”

I will be reading more of the series and checking out the television series, if I can understand the accents 😉

Pardonable Lies (Maisie Dobbs #3)

Pardonable Lies

I loved how this novel fully fleshed out the characters in the series more. Maisie took on more cases in this novel, which made for a much more interesting novel.

Cocaine Blues (Phryne Fisher #1)

Cocaine Blues

I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know the heroine of this series while she solved multiple mysteries. I enjoyed that she flies in the face of convention, which I know is easier to write from the future looking back, but it is fun to imagine someone like Phryne Fisher with an enormous intellect, unlimited funds, and a daring sense of social propriety solving mysteries, while genuinely caring about the neglected and poor. Oh, and a shoot out in a mystery novel with a female detective earned the author some bonus points!

Flying Too High (Phryne Fisher #2)

Flying too High

Long story, but I ended up reading the first, the third, and then the second novels in this series. While this novel still helped established who the main character is, the third was the most enjoyable because it dug into the mystery without wasting time on character development.

Murder on the Ballarat Train (Phryne Fisher #3)

Murder on the Ballarat Train

Phryne Fisher is an interesting character. She adopts abused children, solves crimes, and I can’t wait to see how she develops more! This is a really easy-listening series. I like to listen for 30 minutes or so before I try to go to bed.

Death at Victoria Dock (Phryne Fisher #4)

Death at Victoria Dock

I liked this follow up, but I’m still trying to adjust to that kind raunchiness in a story that takes place when women couldn’t even be doctors alongside men!

(The Grantchester Mysteries #1) Sidney Chambers and the Shadow of Death

The Shadow of Death

This novel was pretty good. I confused by how many mysteries Sidney Chambers solved during the one novel that weren’t necessarily related. I do plan on reading more of the series because I am interested in the main character as a character. I even watched an episode from PBS of the TV show they created from the novel. It was the exact same story, not like Amazon’s Bosch, which is an entirely new storyline, loosely based on the series.

Summerlong

Summerlong

The “meat” of the novel was good. The overall impression was horrendous. Every time I thought of the novel, I went back to Goodreads and removed a star.

A Duty to the Dead

A Duty to the Dead

I love Maisie Dobbs mysteries, but they have a touch of a new-ageness that kind of freak me out. Bess Crawford is the perfect answer to Dobbs! It’s much darker, though. Bess Crawford is not trained to solve mysteries in any way, but she’s a naturally curious and smart woman who who is a nurse during WWI. I’m interested in reading more of the series, which only has a few novels. Charles Todd, the author, is actually a mother and son team. They’ve written 17 or so novels in another mystery series. I just got the first novel from Paperback Swap, so I’m looking forward to seeing if I like Inspector Ian Rutledge!

If I Stay

If I Stay

This one made my cry. Really sobbed at first. I thought that it was rather though provoking for a Young Adult novel, which made me glad. I hope that teen girls read it and think harder about their own lives and why they live–and maybe even purse more things like art, music, and family time. I am looking forward to reading the second novel!

Messenger of Truth (Maisie Dobbs #4)

messenger of truth

I enjoyed the mystery here more, plus a little more resolution on Maisie’s personal life. Had to read books 3 and 4 very quickly because I had them on loan from the library – audio version – on overdrive. There is someone who was one book ahead of me and VERY slow. I waited on hold forever for book 3, so while I was waiting, I checked books 4-6 out. Now, I’m ahead of this other person because I listen to books a lot faster than they do. That person took almost all 21 days. I was afraid they just checked it out and let it sit/didn’t know how to return it.

As soon as I finished book 4 (quickly), I returned it, so they could have it, but now I’m ahead. Boom!

An Incomplete Revenge (Maisie Dobbs #5)

An Incomplete Revenge

This was an interesting look at how Londoners picked hops on estates with for two weeks each fall; while there, Gypsies were camped on the edge of the town. It was specifically interesting because the novel gave an insight into Maisie’s Gypsy heritage and hinted that it had something to do with her “third” sight.

Her Royal Spyness (Her Royal Spyness #1)

Her Royal Spyness

Obviously, I’ve started listening to and reading a lot more British (or Australian) mystery novels that take place around the World Wars. This was a cute story/mystery, so I think I will try out the next novel!

The Stories We Tell

The Stories We Tell

I enjoyed this novel because it takes place in places that I know and could picture. I liked this novel, but I didn’t love it.

The Girl Who Chased the Moon

The Girl Who Chased the Moon

This whimsical novel was a great read/listen for the summer. I haven’t read anything else by Sarah Addison Allen, but I have some on hold!

In the Unlikely Event

in the unlikely event

I absolutely adored this novel! I thought it was an odd summer release, since the majority of the action takes place in the middle of winter; however, I it is a great novel no matter the time of year because the story does take span over the course of the main character’s life – if you can call her that. The novel does follow a ton of characters!

classics

Romolaromola

Really preachy and not very entertaining. Maybe if I had done more research on the time period that it was written about, I would have liked it more, but I didn’t…

The Bostonians

the bostonians

This novel took a few tries. It wasn’t bad, but the first time that I tried to read it, I had to move it to “finish later,” because I just wasn’t in the mood for a James novel. You have be in the right frame of mind, I think. The thing is, though, is that there are so many Henry James novels to chose from!

And to be honest, I enjoyed the novel a lot more once I read a summary that told me that the novel was satire about the women’s movement. It made what seemed slightly absurd actually quite funny.

Friday’s Child

Friday's ChildI loved this novel a lot more than some of Heyer’s Regency Romances. It had the humor of novels like Arabella and Fredrica, but it was slightly longer with more substance than those novels. Friday’s Child didn’t stop at the marriage of an out of place woman in high society, but rather examined the ramifications of the marriage, which were not easy on either party, like I am most likely to imagine as some of Heyer’s books come to a close, and I move on to other novels.

Friday’s Child may move into my most recommended Heyer novel because the main character, Hero, who is aptly named, challenges social conventions, is true to her word, but also displays a depth of feeling that some other Heyer heroines lack.

Overall, this novel had the greatest set of well developed characters in all of the Regency Romances that I’ve read so far, and I’ve read quite a few!

April Lady

April Lady

Another tale of marriage between two people who don’t realize that they love each other and full of misunderstandings. I am glad that we get married a little differently now. Not my favorite Heyer novel, but I did like it.

Cotillion

cotillionThis is one of my favorite Heyer novels now! Like most novels, a naive woman asks an improper favor from a “rake,” but doesn’t realize it. He says yes, and it is fun to watch him slowly change… 🙂

Black Sheep

The Black Sheep

I liked this one, too! Surprise!

The Corinthian

The Corinthian

This was a good Georgette Heyer novel, but nothing to write home about.

read these

Love May Fail

Pretty Baby

Among the Ten Thousand Things

Friday’s Child – If you are a Heyer fan, pick this one up!

In the Unlikely Event

if you have time

Somebody I Used to Know – This was a fairly interesting interesting psychological thriller/love story.

Birds of a Feather – If you haven’t tried the Maisie Dobbs series, you should try it. I thought that this was a great follow up.

A Duty to the Dead

don't bother smaller

The Litigators

Romola

Summerlong

What I Read: Round Up of Monthly Reads

You can read my past monthly round ups:

June 2015
May 2015

April 2015

March 2015

February 2015

And other archived roundups here!

Also, you can find other individual book reviews, tips on saving money on Audible books, book recommendations  based on genres and all things related to literature here!

Don’t forget that you can add me as a friend on Goodreads so I can steal ideas on what to read next–or see your ratings, so I know what to stay away from!

Did you read anything good last month? Are you participating in any challenges? What should I be reading? 

Will be linking up with The Modern Mrs. Darcy for Quick-Lit!

 

Please note that comments with links that are not relevant to the discussion will not be approved. Personal signatures with blog URLs will be deleted. Please use the Disqus profile to add your blog’s URL, so that I can find you.

Categories: What I Read Last Month Tags: , ,
What I Read Last Month: June


What I Read Last Month: June 2015 >>> Seriously, Sarah?
I worked a little bit on my Summer Reading Challenge and TBR Pile Challenge this month. Also, I decided to read a few classics and fun novels. Basically, I was all over the place!
Contemporary

Life After Life

Life After Life

Honestly, a few weeks after reading this novel, I barely remember it. I know it got a ton of awards and lots of people love it, and maybe it was too difficult for my brain to understand during that time period, but… it didn’t stick with me.

The Kind Worth Killing

The Kind Worth Killing

The story was simple and an exploration of moral dilemmas, but I think it was overrated.

The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England

The Plantagenets

This was a looooooooooooooooong one. However, I really liked it. I don’t read/listen to a lot of non-fiction history books, but this one was really helpful. I’ve read historical fiction novels about the beginning of the Plantagenent family through the end of the reign of Richard the Lionheart and then novels that pick back up with the War of the Roses, but there are several hundred (almost a thousand) years of history that I didn’t know about. This book filled that in for me!

There is a sequel to this book. I am thinking about listening to it. Reading? No way.

Where They Found Her

Where They Found Her

I found this novel more “adult” than the author’s first novel, Reconstructing Amelia, which seemed more young adult. It wasn’t the best novel that I’ve ever read, but I liked it. It kept me guessing until the end. I read the hardback instead of listening, since I read that the novel would be told through several mediums – like Reconstructing Amelia, which used text messages, instant messages, emails, and many types of prose. There weren’t as many in this novel, but I still liked it.

Recovery and Renewal:

Your Essential Guide to Overcoming Dependency and Withdrawal from Sleeping Pills, Other ‘Benzo’ Tranquillisers and Antidepressants

Recovery and Renewal

I found this book extremely helpful. I am always being switched around on my medications, so it is no secret that I have gone through withdrawal a few times. I’m not addicted, but physically dependent. As the author of the book points out, the people who post on the internet about their withdrawals are usually the ones with horror stories or who did not cope well. The author actually had an extremely horrific withdrawal, but as a counselor, she utilized her formal training on herself (the author is also in the UK where the medical system is different). Anyway, I recommend this for anyone who is tapering or going to be tapering off of a benzo.

Lessons from Madame Chic: 20 Stylish Secrets I Learned While Living in Paris

Lessons from Madame Chic

I read this for the Summer Reading Challenge. I picked it up as a book that I had never heard of before. It seemed interesting. While it would be really easy to make fun of, I still didn’t mind it terribly. I did think it was interesting to read about an entire society of people who live with “capsule” wardrobes. [I’ve never been to France and cannot vouch for the validity of any of the book.] I hardly have one, but my closet has been whittled down due to the fact that I’ve lost weight, so a lot of clothes went upstairs because they were too big and don’t need that many different outfits anymore, anyway.

[Summer Reading Challenge: 10 points: Read a book you have never heard of before.]

Picture Perfect

Picture Perfect

I chose this novel because it has alliteration in the title. It was the shortest one I could find – I am kicking myself for reading Dear Daughter before the start of the challenge! It was funny and fit. Not to spoil a book that came out 20 years ago, but I don’t think the ending was very realistic, but I’m not a professionally trained counselor.

[Summer Reading Challenge: 30 points: Read a book with an alliterative title. (All words in the title must begin with the same letter; no exceptions for articles or prepositions. Examples: Gone Girl or Nicholas Nickleby. Yes, this is tough, which is why it’s worth the most points!)]

Second Life

second life

It took over half of the novel for the story to start to “come together.” And by “come together,” I mean that the torrid affair scenes cooled down enough for the story to move forward. In the end, Watson made a good point about life, but it got lost in pandering to trendy literature.

[Note for other readers: This book is not PG-13. It might test the limits of R ratings, if you’re not comfortable with reading that. And some of it was gratuitous, whereas some added to the plot.]

Maisie Dobbs (Maisie Dobbs #1)

maisie dobbs #1

Solid 3.5, so I’m rounding up, since I rate everything a 3!
I put it down a few times, so it wasn’t as compelling as I would have liked, but I’m kind of burned out on books that take place during the World Wars.
The “mystery” wasn’t as much of a mystery as I would have liked, but I think it introduced readers to the main character and her background, nicely. I intend on reading the next book in the series!

[Summer Reading Challenge: 25 points: Read a book that is part of a series with at least four books. There are at least 11 novels in this series so far.]

The Black Album

The Black Album

I purchased this novel with the short story at the end back in 2010 or 2011. I really bought it for the short story. I read that. So, for the summer reading challenge of reading something that’s been on my shelf for 2 years, I chose this novel.

[Summer Reading Challenge: 10 points: Read a book that has been on your TBR list for at least two years. (If you’ve had a Goodreads account for 2+ years, this will be easy to figure out. If you don’t, do your best to pick a book you’re pretty sure you’ve been wanting to read for years.)]

Your Drug May Be Your Problem: How & Why to Stop Taking Psychiatric Medications

your drug may be the problem

This book mostly focuses on antidepressants, but I picked it up with the hopes that it would talk more about benzodiazipines. However, some medications marketed as antidepressants have been given to me over the years as neurological medications, as well as the benzos. I guess it is obvious from what I’m reading that I am trying to educate myself more on what medications could be doing to me. I’m just an English major, but as a professional patient, who has been reading medical literature online for years, I decided to graduate to books.

Modern Romance

Modern Romance

I laughed, I learned, and how the heck did I end up married? I listened to the book (so I didn’t get to see all of the funny charts that Ansari was putting on Instagram), but his asides to the listeners were hilarious. It seemed well researched and even if it wasn’t, the excerpts from the focus groups were hilarious.

Hausfrau

Hausfrau

I think there was a lot to learn from this story, but the ending left me wanting more concrete details. Like Second Life, I think a lot of the story was obfuscated by the endless affairs for me, but unlike Second Life, this novel did a better job of actually getting to “the point.” Essbaum is a wonderful writer who wove the main character’s therapy sessions (and psychological theories) with language, how we use it (and how it might reflect our personalities – I loved that part), and just more than I can fit in this review.

The Rule of Four

The Rule of Four

I really enjoyed this novel. It was a less complicated and less adventurous DaVinici Code or National History [I only watched the movies… and National History was just a movie I liked. Don’t judge 😉 ].

classics

Ruth
Ruth

Why so many sad stories for the Victorians? Hardy? Wharton? Stop it. I liked this right up till the end. Ruth, I love you.

[Summer Reading Challenge: 15 points: Read a book by an author you have read before. (No re-reads for this one.)]

Where Angels Fear to Tread

where angels fear to tread

I didn’t love this novel, but I didn’t hate it. It was kind of sad.

The Reluctant Widow

the reluctant widow

This novel had a lot more murder and intrigue than I’m used to in Heyer novels!

The Nonesuch
the nonesuch

A typical Heyer novel, but in a good way.

Drumroll… it took me two months this time…

finished summer reading challenge

You can read my projected list here, but my actual list is here! They aren’t very similar, like my winter lists. I want to thank Megan for hosting these seasonal challenges because they stretch me, and I look forward to them!

read theseThe Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England – If you like historical fiction, this was a wonderful companion to help make sense of the novels, but it is not a light read.

Modern Romance – Listen if you can!

if you have time

Where They Found Her

Maisie Dobbs (Maisie Dobbs #1) – if you like “cozy mysteries.” (Apparently this is a genre).

don't bother smaller

The Kind Worth Killing

Lessons from Madame Chic: 20 Stylish Secrets I Learned While Living in Paris

What I Read: Round Up of Monthly Reads

You can read my past monthly round ups:

May 2015
April 2015

March 2015

February 2015

January 2015

And other archived roundups here!

Also, you can find other individual book reviews, tips on saving money on Audible books, book recommendations  based on genres and all things related to literature here!

Don’t forget that you can add me as a friend on Goodreads so I can steal ideas on what to read next–or see your ratings, so I know what to stay away from!

Did you read anything good last month? Are you participating in any challenges? What should I be reading? 

Will be linking up with The Modern Mrs. Darcy for Quick-Lit!

Please note that comments with links that are not relevant to the discussion will not be approved. Personal signatures with blog URLs will be deleted. Please use the Disqus profile to add your blog’s URL, so that I can find you.

Categories: What I Read Last Month Tags: , , ,
What I Read Last Month: April


What I Read April

I broke up the novels between contemporary and classic, as usual. If you scroll to the bottom, you can see the ones that I would say to definitely read, read if you have time, or skip all together.

The reviews are a lot shorter than normal. I had been trying to keep reviews on Goodreads as I went or typing them up here, but that didn’t happen this month. I just formatted and wrote “review.”

I’ll just go ahead and blame my busyness with the Summer reading challenge for the short reviews, but the truth is that I am forcing myself to smile as I type to get through the pain. This is my favorite post each month, even though it has lost its popularity. I guess I’ll at least be able to look back on it as a reading diary of sorts!

Contemporary

Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey: The Lost Legacy of Highclere Castle

Lady Almina and the Real Downton AbbeyRating: 4/5 Stars

I thoroughly enjoyed learning about life during the time period, as well as the house that inspired Downton Abbey. The fact that there is some Egyptian treasure hunting and the discovery of a very famous tomb didn’t hurt the story, either!

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
The Power of Habit Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

 Rating: 4/5 Stars

The beginning of this book was a little bit slow. I’m not sure if I read the information in another book or watched it in some type of documentary (I’ve never taken a psychology class), but it wasn’t new information. A few of the chapters were more about companies or organizations, but they were still interesting.

I really enjoyed the diagrams. At the beginning of the book, I could see more of how things like “keystone” habits have worked in my life before, rather than how to create them in my own life now. Fortunately, Duhigg included some emails from readers, plus the appendix had helpful information. Overall, the book was super interesting. I don’t read many “self help” or non fiction books, but I loved this.

Love in the Time of Cholera

love in the time of cholera

Rating: 4/5 Stars

I’m definitely not one to blush at a novel, but this one definitely centered heavily on the aspects of sex in the relationships between men and women, both married and unmarried. The descriptions weren’t graphic, but the writer really explored the implications of relationships where sex was the foundation and where sex wasn’t, and how they were different. Not my usual cup of tea.

This novel fulfills a requirement for my 50 “classic” books because it is older than 25 years, but I’m including it in contemporaries.

Everything Changes

everything changes

Rating: 4/5 Stars

This is an earlier Tropper novel. If you like his novels, I highly recommend it. He is great at juxtaposing heart-wrenching, dysfunctional family moments next to some laugh out loud scenes. He strikes a great balance. Also, I’ve kind of been reading his novels in reverse order that they were written, so I’ve noticed that he’s going more ambiguous with his endings as time goes on. I particularly liked the ending of this novel, not to give too much away.

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest

the girl who kicked the hornet's nest

Rating: 4/5 Stars

This was a long one, but I’m glad I finished all three novels. I liked the character development, although I would have liked to see some of the characters change a little bit for the better; however, too much change probably would not have been realistic.
The final novel brought the entire story full circle, which I really did not see happening!

The Secret Place

The Secret Place

Rating: 5/5 Stars

I absolutely loved this novel. I had read some more negative reviews, which is why I held off on the long novel. I did listen on audio, though. I started reading the series last summer and read a few and listened to a few. Generally, I loved to listen to the Irish narrators, however, I couldn’t wait for this to end from the narration standpoint. Since the novel is about the murder of a high school boy that takes place on the grounds of an all girls boarding school, the detectives interview a ton of teenagers. I’m sure French must have written the dialogue to mimic the way an Irish teenager would talk, but listening to an adult male mimic a teenage girl (mostly girls) for most of the 20 hours was frustrating and probably a poor choice for production. Still, the story was so good that I could get around that.

Plain Truth

Plain Truth

Rating: 4/5 Stars

This was my first Picoult novel. I was interested in it because it involved a mystery. Since I wanted to try one of her novels, I figured that I should chose one that had a plot that seemed like one I might pick no matter who the author was. Again, I listened to this on audio. Big Mistake. I’ve never really read any fiction with Amish characters, but I’ve seen a few TV shows. The narration was horribly annoying, and I imagine would have been slightly offensive to any Amish listeners. Hearing the narrator switch back and forth between the brash Pittsburgh lawyer and the overly-meek Amish girl and then her family was distracting. I guess that I just want to hear the story and prefer that the narrators keep their storybook voices for reading their own children to bed.

classics

The American

the american

Rating: 3/5 Stars

This book wasn’t a horror novel like Turn of the Screw, but it definitely creeped me out a lot. It’s not for everyone; it’s especially not for people who are not specific Henry James fans.

The House of Mirth

The House of Mirth

Rating: 4/5 Stars

This novel was much more sad than I anticipated after reading Wharton’s The Age of Innocence, which was written later, though. I did love it, though.

The Moonstone

the moonstone

Rating: 4/5 Stars

I liked this novel for what it was. I thought it was an interesting glimpse into the Colonial world that was fascinated by all things “other,” to the point that they thought there were magical powers in diamonds, etc. The absolutely terrible detective work, if you could call it that, was funny. I did enjoy that like The Woman in White, this novel was also told in the past tense, but in chronological order, by observers of “the crime.” The second observer, though, who was obviously meant to make fun of the evangelical Christians of the day, was a bit over the top and got on my nerves. I almost put the novel down.

Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Mystery and Manners Occasional Prose

Rating: 4/5 Stars

If you are a Flannery O’Connor fan (or have to write a paper about anything she’s written), I highly recommend this book.

The King’s General

the king's general

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

While this novel did rely on some Gothic standards, it was not what I was expecting from du Maurier, after reading Rebecca and My Cousin Rachel. It is not much of a Gothic novel at all. It does tell the story of a little studied English Civil War, while the main character, who is paralyzed, flagrantly thumbs her nose at all social conventions. It is a tense story because you are always wondering if she is on the “right” side.

Sprig Muslin

Sprig Muslin

Rating: 3/5 Stars

Ehhhh. Not a great Heyer novel, like when I compare it to my favorites, but it didn’t actually make me angry for creating dumb female characters who were dependent on villainous male characters, either. Just below average.

Mary Anne

mary anne

Rating: 3/5 Stars

I found this du Maurier novel based on her great-great grandmother extremely interesting and a worthwhile read, even though the main character is entirely unsympathetic, in my opinion. Some people might find her determination to survive at all costs sympathetic; however, I think she got greedy. It was an interesting look at the English legal system and the role of women.

There was a particularly humorous and observant quote (I forgot to write it down and can’t find it anywhere) at the beginning of the novel made by the “child” version of Mary Anne, who sees men as weak creatures after watching her stepfather and younger brothers, yet realizing that even though they are much weaker than women, they hold the purse strings and run society.

read these

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

Everything Changes [If you like Tropper novels.]

Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose [If you like O’Connor or Literary Theory/Criticism.]

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest

if you have time

Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey: The Lost Legacy of Highclere Castle

The Secret Place
don't bother smaller

The American

Sprig Muslin

 

During May, I’ll be reading novels for Megan’s Summer Reading Challenge. You can read my picks here. I’ll probably be slowed down by a few lengthy and a few more paperbacks than normal, plus I anticipate even more pain this month than last. I tried to pick a few fun ones, but not everything on my list is my dream book. So, we’ll just have to see!

What I Read

You can read my past monthly round ups:

March 2015
February 2015

January 2015

December 2014

November 2014
And other archived roundups here!

Also, you can find other individual book reviews, tips on saving money on Audible books, book recommendations based on genres and all things related to literature here!

Don’t forget that you can add me as a friend on Goodreads so I can steal ideas on what to read next–or see your ratings, so I know what to stay away from!

Will be linking up with The Modern Mrs. Darcy for Quick-Lit!

 

 

Please note that comments with links that are not relevant to the discussion will not be approved. Personal signatures with blog URLs will be deleted. Please use the Disqus profile to add your blog’s URL, so that I can find you.

Categories: What I Read Last Month Tags: , ,