2017 Classic Reading Challenge Picks

2017-classic-reading-challenge-with-title

 

1. A 19th Century Classic – any book published between 1800 and 1899.

Silas Marner (1861)

silas-marner

I love George Eliot. I can’t wait to read this!

2. A 20th Century Classic – any book published between 1900 and 1967. All books MUST have been published at least 50 years ago to qualify. The only exception is books written at least 50 years ago, but published later, such as posthumous publications.

A Passage to India (1924)

passage-to-india

I haven’t loved all of the E.M. Forster things that I have read, but I am going to finally give this a try. I started it awhile ago.

3. A classic by a woman author.

Frenchman’s Creek (1941)

frenchmens-creek

I love Daphne du Maurier! Why not read another one of her novels. I have not read this one, fortunately.

4. A classic in translation. Any book originally written published in a language other than your native language. Feel free to read the book in your language or the original language. (You can also read books in translation for any of the other categories).

One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967)

one-hundred-years-of-solitude

Finally, this novel is 50 years old. I am not usually a big fan of literature that is translated into English, but, I didn’t hate the last book that I read by this author.

5. A classic published before 1800. Plays and epic poems are acceptable in this category also.

Evelina (1778)

evelina

This novel is a little bit long, but I have ALL year!

6. An romance classic. I’m pretty flexible here about the definition of romance. It can have a happy ending or a sad ending, as long as there is a strong romantic element to the plot.

The Pursuit of Love (1945)

the-pursuit-of-love

A Mitford book has been on my list FOREVER! I read a great biography about the family, so it will be great to read one of her novels.

7. A Gothic or horror classic.

Rebecca

rebecca

This will be a reread for me, but who doesn’t love Rebecca?

8. A classic with a number in the title. Examples include A Tale of Two Cities, Three Men in a Boat, The Nine Tailors, Henry V, Fahrenheit 451, etc.

Two on a Tower (1882)

two-on-a-tower

This is the only Hardy novel that I haven’t read, and fortunately, it has a number in the title!

9. A classic about an animal or which includes the name of an animal in the title. It an actual animal or a metaphor, or just the name. Examples include To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Metamorphosis, White Fang, etc.

Of Mice and Men (1937)

of-mice-and-men

I have read one Steinbeck novel, which was wonderful. So, I am looking forward to this one!

10. A classic set in a place you’d like to visit. It can be real or imaginary: The Wizard of Oz, Down and Out in Paris and London, Death on the Nile, etc.

Dubliners (1914)

dubliners

I read some of these short stories a long time ago. However, it’s been 15+ years. Ireland would be my dream vacation, so what’s better than a book called Dubliners?

11. An award-winning classic. It could be the Newbery award, the Prix Goncourt, the Pulitzer Prize, the James Tait Award, etc. Any award, just mention in your blog post what award your choice received.

The Mysterious Affair at Styles (1920)

the-mysterious-affair-at-styles

I love Agatha Christie and this novel won Audie Award for Mystery (1997).

12. A Russian Classic. 2017 will be the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, so read a classic by any Russian author.

Lolita (1955)

lolita

I have had this book on my list forever. Time to finally read it! I normally don’t reach for Russian authors.

Thank you to Karen from Books and Chocolate for hosting this!

Don’t forget that you can also sign up to win/read along–you can even win if you don’t finish the entire list! Just go to this site and sign up ASAP!

 

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Categories: Reading Challenge
The Classics Club: Mission Completed

The Classics Club

Well, I completed my mission on time, but I’m a few days late in posting it! Two years ago, I posted that I would read 50 classic books in 2 years. In fact, I read 51 classic books! I accomplished it!

I didn’t write a review for every single book, but I wrote a lot of reviews.

So, I won’t recap all of the reviews–if you’ve been following the blog, I parsed out contemporary and classic novels apart from each other in the monthly reviews. I didn’t write as many round up classic reviews as I would have liked, due to my illnesses!

Without further ado, here is what I read between 12/24/14 and 12/24/16 (starting with the most recently finished and ending with the first one that I read):

Lady Of Quality, Georgette Heyer

Little Women (Little Women, #1), Louisa May Alcott

Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen

Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen

Partners in Crime (Tommy and Tuppence #2), Agatha Christie

Persuasion, Jane Austen

The Warden (Chronicles of Barsetshire #1), Anthony Trollope

Why Shoot a Butler?, Georgette Heyer

Black Sheep, Georgette Heyer

The Corinthian, Georgette Heyer

Cotillion, Georgette Heyer

April Lady, Georgette Heyer

Friday’s Child, Georgette Heyer

The Bostonians, Henry James

Romola, George Eliot

The Nonesuch, Georgette Heyer

The Reluctant Widow, Georgette Heyer

Where Angels Fear to Tread, E.M. Forster

Ruth, Elizabeth Gaskell

Jamaica Inn, Daphne du Maurier

A Civil Contract, Georgette Heyer

The Way We Live Now, Anthony Trollope

Mary Anne, Daphne du Maurier

Sprig Muslin, Georgette Heyer

The King’s General, Daphne du Maurier

The Moonstone, Wilkie Collins

The House of Mirth, Edith Wharton

The American, Henry James

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers

Charity Girl, Georgette Heyer

Venetia, Georgette Heyer

The Woodlanders, Thomas Hardy

Cousin Kate, Georgette Heyer

In Cold Blood, Truman Capote

The Professor, Charlotte Brontë

The Woman in White, Wilkie Collins

Wessex Tales, Thomas Hardy

The End of the Affair, Graham Greene

The Convenient Marriage, Georgette Heyer

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Tales of the Jazz Age, F. Scott Fitzgerald

Adam Bede, George Eliot

The Sound and the Fury, William Faulkner

This Side of Paradise, F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Talented Mr. Ripley (Ripley, #1), Patricia Highsmith

Madame Bovary, Gustave Flaubert

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, D.H. Lawrence

The Beautiful and Damned, F. Scott Fitzgerald

Cranford, Elizabeth Gaskell

Daisy Miller, Henry James

Little Men (Little Women, #2), Louisa May Alcott

The Awakening, Kate Chopin

 

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Categories: Book Review, Reading Challenge
Erin’s 2017 Reading Challenge

bookchallengebyerin6-0

I am super excited to be joining Erin’s book challenge! I spent the first few days of December putting together my list of possible books. You can join the Facebook group and read more about the 2017 Reading Challenge on her blog here.

Here are the categories and my choices!

+ 5 points. Freebie book:

The Family Way by Rhys Bowen

the-family-way

+ 10 points. Starts with a “W” book

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler

we-are-all-completely-beside-ourselves

+10 points. Six word title book

The Masque of the Black Tulip by Lauren Willig

the-masque-of-the-black-tulip

+ 15 points. Mostly green cover book:

The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan or

the-bookshop-on-the-corner

The Summer Queen by Elizabeth Chadwick

the-summer-queen

+ 20 points. Homonym book

Jane Steele by Lyndsay Faye

jane-steele

+ 20 points. Favorite author book:

The Wrong Side of Goodbye (Harry Bosch, #21) Michael Connelly

the-wrong-side-of-goodbye

+ 25 points. Book Set in City/State where you live (South Carolina):

The Underground Railroad

the-underground-railroad

+ 30 points Rory Gilmore Book

Emma by Jane Austen

emma

+ 30 points. Genre not usually read book (self help/non fiction):

This Is Where You Belong: The Art and Science of Loving the Place You Live by Melody Warnick

this-is-where-you-belong

+ 35 points. Time travel book:

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain

a-connecticut-yankee-in-king-arthurs-court

So, these are my picks, but they are totally changeable. Do you have any other suggestions? What would you pick?

 

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Reading Challenge: Classics 2016

Happy new year! I thought that I’d start out with a book post, of course.

Last year, I rolled through my first 2/3 of the classics reading challenge, but as I fell sick, I didn’t continue to pursue the last few books. However, I am ready to redeem myself with this year’s Back to the Classics Challenge 2016!

back to the classics 2016 challenge

I’m also in the middle of my two year Classics Challenge, where I am reading 50 classic books by THIS Christmas Eve. You can join up any time. You can read my projected list of novels and learn more about joining here.

If you want to join the Back to the Classics Challenge 2016, click here for more information and the link up!

For this year’s classic’s challenge, these are my picks (picks are subject to change)!

Classic Book Picks:

A 19th Century Classic – any book published between 1800 and 1899.

The Warden, Anthony Trollope, published 1855.

A 20th Century Classic – any book published between 1900 and 1966.Just like last year, all books MUST have been published at least 50 years ago to qualify. The only exception is books written at least 50 years ago, but published later.

Bath Tangle, Georgette Heyer, 1955

A classic by a woman author.

Evelina or the History of a Young Lady’s Entrance into the World, Fanny Burney, 1778

A classic in translation. Any book originally written published in a language other than your native language. Feel free to read the book in your language or the original language.

Candide, Voltaire, 1759

A classic by a non-white author. Can be African-American, Asian, Latino, Native American, etc.

Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov, 1955

An adventure classic – can be fiction or non-fiction. Children’s classics like Treasure Island are acceptable in this category.

The Innocents Abroad, Mark Twain, 1875

A fantasy, science fiction, or dystopian classic. Dystopian could include classics like 1984, and children’s classics like The Hobbit are acceptable in this category also.

The Hobbit, J.R.R. Tolkien, 1937

A classic detective novel. It must include a detective, amateur or professional. This list of books from the Golden Age of Detective Fiction is a great starting point if you’re looking for ideas.

N or M?, Agatha Christie, 1941

A classic which includes the name of a place in the title. It can be the name of a house, a town, a street, etc. Examples include Bleak House, Main Street, The Belly of Paris, or The Vicar of Wakefield.

Washington Square, Henry James, 1880

A classic which has been banned or censored. If possible, please mention why this book was banned or censored in your review.

The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemmingway, 1926

Re-read a classic you read in school (high school or college). If it’s a book you loved, does it stand the test of time? If it’s a book you disliked, is it any better a second time around?

Persuasion, Jane Austen, 1817

This one is a big chore for me, since I hate rereading novels; however, I didn’t read Persuasion until Brit Lit II in college, so I’ve only read it once. Plus, Austen novels aren’t bad a second time!

A volume of classic short stories. This must be one complete volume, at least 8 short stories. It can be an anthology of stories by different authors, or all the stories can be by a single author. Children’s stories are acceptable in this category also.

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, This audible novel includes 12 Stories: “A Scandal in Bohemia,” “The Red-Headed League,” “A Case of Identity,” “The Boscombe Valley Mystery,” “The Five Orange Pips,” “The Man with the Twisted Lip,” “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle,” “The Adventure of the Speckled Band,” “The Adventure of the Engineer’s Thumb,” “The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor,” “The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet,” and “The Adventure of the Copper Beeches.”

What are your thoughts? Any suggestions for better picks? What do you plan to read this year?

Don’t forget to add me as a Goodreads friend as I try to tackle 200, instead of 150 books this year!

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Categories: Reading Challenge, Uncategorized Tags: ,
Literary Ladies Book Club Reading Challenge


Reading Challenge smaller

Another book challenge? Yes! I’m linking up with See You in a Porridge to show my progress! The challenge runs from June 21, 2015 until September 21, 2015. And this reader is finished!!!

1. A YA book
If I Stay, Gayle Forman

2. Non US Author
Case Histories, Kate Atkinson (British)

3. A book that was recommended by a blogger (or instagrammer / you-tuber / goodreads-er)
Cocaine Blues, Kerry Greenwood (Phryne Fisher Series) – This mystery and some other series were recommended by Moira at Hearth and Homefront.

4. A book that has been on your TBR list for a year or more
The Black Album, Hanif Kureishi

5. A book with a kickass female character
Pardonable Lies, Jacqueline Winspear

6. A book that is or will be a movie (or TV show).
Sidney Chambers and the Shadow of Death (The Grantchester Mysteries #1), James Runcie, which is a PBS series.

7. A book written by a comedian or celebrity – or even a memoirif neither of those are your jam.
Modern Romance, Aziz Ansari (READ THIS)

8. A book with a one word title.
Romola, George Eliot

9. A suspenseful book – a mystery, a thriller, a book about revenge!
Pretty Baby, Mary Kubica

10. A book about Summer, with Summer in the title, or in any way related to Summer because this is a Summer challenge!
Summerlong, Dean Bakopoulos

Don’t forget that you can be my friend on Goodreads to see what I read/give me ideas!

So, I finished up and read books that I really enjoyed (minus Romala, which was long and boring and I don’t recommend it. Ever.) them!

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Categories: Reading, Reading Challenge Tags: , ,
Summer Reading Challenge Results

 


Summer Reading Challenge Results: Seriously, Sarah?

I would like to thank Megan at Semi-Charmed Kind of Life for hosting a twice a year reading challenge. Last winter was my first participation, in which I I read everything within a month! It took two months this time, but I liked it because it pushed me to read books that I had meant to read or books that had been on my “I would like to read one day… maybe…” list outside of my comfort zone!

Here are the final results!

5 points: Freebie! Read any book that fits the general rules.

Lady Catherine, the Earl, and the Real Downton Abbey (The Women of the Real Downton Abbey #2)

Lady Catherine, the Earl, and the Real Downton Abbey

I was definitely disappointed in how much it overlapped with the first book in the series. If I could give half stars, it would be 2.5 because it wasn’t terrible, but there wasn’t anything earth shattering in the WWII research, of course, and there wasn’t even much detail on the clothes, manners, or things that I found fascinating in the first book.
Those things were mentioned, but inconsistently. It felt like if the author needed to fill some space, she’d throw it in there, instead of focusing on it.

Pages: 368


10 points: Read a book you have never heard of before. (Just go to a shelf and pick a book based on the cover, the title, whatever you want!)

Lessons from Madame Chic: 20 Stylish Secrets I Learned While Living in Paris

Lessons from Madame Chic

I picked it up as a book that I had never heard of before. It seemed interesting. While it would be really easy to make fun of, I still didn’t mind it terribly. I did think it was interesting to read about an entire society of people who live with “capsule” wardrobes. [I’ve never been to France and cannot vouch for the validity of any of the book.] I hardly have one, but my closet has been whittled down due  to the fact that I’ve lost weight, so a lot of clothes went upstairs because they were too big and don’t need that many different outfits anymore, anyway.

Pages: 283


10 points: Read a book that has been on your TBR list for at least two years. (If you’ve had a Goodreads account for 2+ years, this will be easy to figure out. If you don’t, do your best to pick a book you’re pretty sure you’ve been wanting to read for years.)

The Black Album

The Black Album

I purchased this novel with the short story at the end back in 2010 or 2011. I really bought it for the short story. I read that. So, for the summer reading challenge of reading something that’s been on my shelf for 2 years, I chose this novel.

Pages: 320


10 points: Read a book that won a Goodreads “Best Book” award in 2014.

We Were Liars

we were liars

I have heard a lot about this novel. It won a Goodreads award, of course. I haven’t read anything similar like it in a long time, so I did enjoy it. I was a bit (and still confused) why the main character called her friends “The Liars” from the very first, but I’m sure that’s a spoiler. I read the Kindle version fairly quickly. It was short, interesting, and very trendy.

Pages: 227


15 points: Read a book by an author who is completely new to you.

Don’t Try to Find Me

don't try to find me

Decent coming of age/young adult novel. Don’t buy the publisher’s advertising. Nothing like Gone Girl/Reconstructing Amelia. Not innovative at all. This novel did fulfill a summer reading challenge requirement, which was a plus, since it was an easy read.

Pages:  384


15 points: Read a book by an author you have read before. (No re-reads for this one.)

Ruth
Ruth

Why so many sad stories for the Victorians? Hardy? Wharton? Stop it. I liked this right up till the end. Ruth, I love you.

Pages: 499


15 points: Read a book with “light” or “dark” in the title. (Or “lightness” or “darkness.”)

Where All Light Tends to Go

Where All Light Tends to GoI’m really glad that I took a chance on this novel. I did need something with “light” in the title for a reading challenge, but when Audible recommended it, it seemed to be the perfect Southern Lit book for me. I can’t wait to read more from David Joy in the future.
I have to say that the novel seemed all too heartbreakingly realistic. Joy did a great job writing beautifully about the messy side of life in the rural South.

Pages: 260


20 points: Read a book with the name of a city, state or country in the title.

Jamacia Inn

jamacia inn

Ehh, this has to be my least favorite du Maurier novel, and I love her novels. It was predictable and kind of cheesy.

Pages: 320


20 points: Read a book with an animal on the cover.

A Civil Contract

a civil contract

This novel, by an author that I obviously like, was read for the Summer Reading Challenge to fulfill the category for a novel with an animal on the cover. I listened to the version with the horse on it!

a civil contract animal cover

Pages: 320


25 points: Read a book that is part of a series with at least four books.

Maisie Dobbs (Maisie Dobbs #1)

maisie dobbs #1

Solid 3.5, so I’m rounding up, since I rate everything a 3!
I put it down a few times, so it wasn’t as compelling as I would have liked, but I’m kind of burned out on books that take place during the World Wars.
The “mystery” wasn’t as much of a mystery as I would have liked, but I think it introduced readers to the main character and her background, nicely. I intend on reading the next book in the series!

Pages: 309 / At least 11 novels in the series


25 points: Read a book that is longer than 500 pages long.

The Way We Live Now

the way we live now

Sorry, Trollope you could have cut this book by at least 1/4. However, I still liked it.

Pages: 1024


30 points: Read a book with an alliterative title. (All words in the title must begin with the same letter; no exceptions for articles or prepositions. Examples: Gone Girl or Nicholas Nickleby. Yes, this is tough, which is why it’s worth the most points!)

Picture Perfect

Picture Perfect

I chose this novel because it has alliteration in the title. It was the shortest one I could find – I am kicking myself for reading Dear Daughter before the start of the challenge! It was funny and fit. Not to spoil a book that came out 20 years ago, but I don’t think the ending was very realistic, but I’m not a professionally trained counselor.

Pages: 369


 

Now, I’ll have to read books from my other challenges and maybe a few of my fun books from my Summer Reading list… or even some from my Spring Reading list!

 

 

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Categories: Reading, Reading Challenge Tags: , , ,